Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Open House Sunday Interview – Author Debra Purdy Kong

I’m delighted to be a guest blogger on Sally Cronin’s terrific blog today!

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Today’s guest is author Debra Purdy Kong who will be sharing the background to why she writes mysteries, her publishing adventures, her viewing preferences and favourite quote. We will also find out more about her work at then end of the interview.

About Debra Purdy Kong

Years ago, when I was a criminology student, I spent many hours writing about criminal behaviour for term papers. By the time I received my diploma, I realized I’d rather write crime fiction than work for the Criminal Justice System, a decision I’ve never regretted.

While I learned the craft of writing, I worked as a secretary for accountants, professors, lawyers, and a host of other interesting people and businesses. Many experiences from those years worked their way into TAXED TO DEATH, my first mystery novel, which was followed up by FATAL ENCRYPTION.

When I left full time employment to raise my children, I…

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Guest Author: Debra Purdy Kong

I’m delighted to be a guest on Darlene Foster’s blog today!

Darlene Foster's Blog

My guest today is Debra Purdy Kong, a fellow Vancouver author who writes entertaining mysteries. She talks about where she gets her ideas and gives some great advice to anyone thinking of writing.

Debra Purdy Kong’s volunteer experiences, criminology diploma, and various jobs inspired her to write mysteries set in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her employment as a campus security patrol and communications officer provide the background for her two Evan Dunstan mystery novellas, as well as her Casey Holland transit security novels.

Debra has published short stories in a variety of genres as well as personal essays, and articles for publications such as Chicken Soup for the Bride’s Soul, B.C. Parent Magazine, and The Vancouver Sun. In November 2017, she released her 5th Casey Holland mystery thriller, KNOCK KNOCK, and her 2nd Evan Dunstan humorous mystery novella, A TOXIC CRAFT.

How long have you been seriously writing? I’ve been writing…

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The Return of Smorgasbord Open House – Interviews for all writers and other creative artists.

Here’s a great opportunity for all you creative artists!

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

The Open Houseseries ran from January 2016 for four months and was one of the most popular of the interview series.  I thought that we might revisit the theme for 2018.

This series will be joined in the next few weeks by an additional author interview which will be in audio and more details on that shortly.

Would you like to be interviewed?

It is open to writers across blogging, books, poetry as well as artists, musicians and photographers.

It is an opportunity to showcase your work from blog posts to sunsets on Smorgasbord and my social media platforms.

I also want it to showcase the person you are and discover more about what makes them tick, their inspirations and also some fun facts.

I have decided to retain the title of the series as Smorgasbord Open House. If you were interviewed two years ago that is not a…

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Mystery Mondays: “Not Your Typical Christmas Story” by Author Debra Purdy Kong

I’m delighted to appear on Kristina’s terrific blog once again!


Today we host Debra Purdy Kong. Debra’s new Evan Dunstan mystery novella, A Toxic Craft  is out, and I’ve already bought it. The first in the Evan Dunstan series is Dead Man Floating  which I loved, so I couldn’t wait for the second in the series to come be released.

Here’s the exciting news. Both books are on sale right now by Imajin Books! Give yourself a Christmas preset 🙂

Now, over to Debra…

Not Your Typical Christmas Story.

by Debra Purdy Kong

Two of my favorite Christmas movies are A Christmas Story and National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Both moves portray the funnier aspects of pre-Christmas angst and obstacles until the big day arrives and everything turns out okay.

Although our family’s Christmas trees never caught fire as it does in Christmas Vacation, they did fall over a few times when we owned a lot of cats…

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Mystery Mondays: Debra Purdy Kong on Traditional to Self-Publishing

It’s my privilege to be a guest on Kristina Stanley’s blog today. Kristina is a wonderful supporter of authors, and a terrific author herself!


This week on Mystery Mondays we welcome Debra Purdy Kong. I first came across Debra’s writing when I read Opposite of Dark. I loved the book and reached out to Debra on LinkedIn and was very excited to hear back from her. She’s an author who is generous with her time and her advice, which you’ll get some of below.

As you can imagine, I’m happy to host Debra on Mystery Mondays again.

Debra is here to tell you what it’s like to transition from traditional publishing to self-publishing.

I’ve just preordered my copy of Knock Knock and only have to wait 2 days for it to arrive on my kindle!

Over to Debra…

Maintaining Continuity in Changing Times

Knock Knock, front coverThey say that the only constant in life is change. This is especially true for writers. Over the years, I’ve lost count of all the magazines and publishers I’ve worked…

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#amblogging: This Year’s Vacation

Bark and I, winery, Okanagan Falls

As much as I love writing and editing, every now and then I’ve got to stop and take it easy, and this week there was no better place than Penticton, B.C. My family and I spent a quick, eventful five days away, enjoying one another’s company and trying new things, in particular, some of the many wineries along the Naramata Bench.

Joie Winery, Naramata Bench

If you’re a fan of wines, this is a terrific stretch to explore, with over 40 small, highly individualistic wineries nudged together in the hills and valleys overlooking Okanagan Lake. We found that stopping to taste wine at four wineries per afternoon was plenty. Many of the wineries allowed us to sample four to six wines, so you can imagine how the consumption added up.

Kanazawa Winery

Unfortunately, many businesses along the Bench are losing business due to fears about the ongoing wildfires. Penticton, while hazy during our first three days there, is out of the danger zone as I write this, and still going strong. The raised water levels this spring are receding and as you’ll see below, the beaches are coming back. It had been five years between visits to this lovely area. I won’t wait so long next time. Lakeshore Drive, Penticton

By the way, if you’re looking for a great place to stay, try Haven Hill Guest House. We had a great time there.


#amblogging: You Want To Be A What?

I was raised in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada. Back then Surrey was both rural and a rapidly growing urban area for young families. In those days, one salary could support a family in a modest, detached house.

Fifty years later, Vancouver is now one of the most expensive cities in the country. The average Canadian is nearly $22,000 in debt, which doesn’t include a mortgage. The living wage in Vancouver is now set at $20.64 an hour. It’s barely enough for one person to survive on, let alone a family. dollar-signs-money-clip-art-thumb2184272[1]

You can therefore imagine how difficult it is for a writer to survive financially. Truth is, (and this shouldn’t surprise you) that the overwhelming majority of Canadian fiction authors earn far below a poverty wage.

So I gasped when my husband ran into an associate who told him that his 22-year-old child is at university studying to become a writer. His impression was that he wanted to write books for a living, although my husband wasn’t entirely sure about it.

While I’m happy that the younger generation is interested in writing, to think that one can earn a living from fiction at that age is wildly improbable. If I had a chance to talk with this young person, I’d say, “Go ahead and pursue your dream, but get a steady job while doing least until you’ve attended useful writing conferences, networked with authors in the biz, and have some publication credits under your belt.”

I hope he’s doing these things. But I worry. You see, when I’m selling my books at craft fairs, a disturbingly large number of customers assume that I’m making piles of money. Unpublished writers seem shocked that my former publisher only granted me ten free copies of each newly released title, as per our contract. If I wanted more, I had to pay for them, albeit at a discount.

I’ve also encountered writers on forums who appear to be counting on writing income to support meager pensions. Yikes! To all fiction writers out there, have a Plan  B and a Plan C!. Life is stressful enough without putting that kind of financial pressure on yourself.