Preparing for Left Coast Crime Conference

Whale of a Crime, 2019It’s hard to believe that a decade has passed since I last attended a Left Coast Crime conference, or any crime-writing conference, for that matter. But as LCC begins tomorrow, I’ve been in preparation mode, accompanied by plenty of emails for the coordinators to remind us of various events. My itinerary looks something like this:

Thurs. morning, a 2-hours of book-pitching to potential readers.

Thurs. afternoon, 3:45 – 4:30 is our panel discussion, “Technology in Crime Fiction”.

Friday afternoon, is volunteering at the Crime Writers of Canada table, followed by escorting a group of guests on a walk, and then a meal.

Saturday: reading to attendees from my latest book, followed by Saturday night’s banquet Sat., where I’ll be co-hosting a table of ten people.

Somewhere in there, I’m hoping for time to schmooze and catch up with other writers. Meanwhile, I’ve come up with a to-do list, which is:

. double-check itinerary and review all emails to ensure nothing’s forgotten.

. check transit schedule to commute from my home to hotel

. gather books, business cards, panel notes, pens, granola bars, and a form for the bookseller

. prepare insightful answers for moderator’s panel questions

. choose wardrobe

. review information about fellow presenters

. find the registration area, check in, then dash to the first event.

I might have forgotten something, but I guess I’ll find out. The event finishes early Sunday afternoon. I might just need a nap after that.

Two Projects, Lots of Decisions

volunteer-1888823_960_720[1]This week, I’ve been immersed in two projects (until I came down with the flu yesterday), one is the third-draft edit of my urban fantasy novel. It’s been a challenge, a genre I’ve never written before, but it’s slowly coming together. There’s been positive feedback from my writers’ group, but the novel far from reaching the beta reader stage. I’m making lots of changes, page by page, deciding what to cut, what needs fleshing out, and trying to come up with a deadline for myself, given that this project could go on for years. I’ve already been at it for quite some time, and I maybe I should decide on a timeframe to complete the book.

The second project, in its own way, is also challenging, although this one has a set deadline. In the city where I live, I’m also a volunteer with the city’s Citizens Advisory Group. Our task this month is to review twenty-four grant applications and submit our top five for consideration.

Happily, we can do this online and on our own time, so I downloaded the booklet and began reading it late last week. After making notes on all twenty-four, I found it increasingly difficult to decide which organizations most deserve grant money because they all have merit. Collectively, the applications could have an important and positive impact on communities, our environment, and the physical and emotional well-being of residents of all ages.

After a lot of pondering and determining my own criteria, I came up with five and submitted them on Monday (before the flu took hold), but I wish there was more money to spare. Our small city’s budget isn’t large and the demands far outweigh the available funds. As I’m only one of over two hundred people in the advisory group, my decisions might not have any impact on the final outcome, but at least I tried and did what I thought was best.