A Wedding Celebration!

Cutting the CakeFollowers of this blog know that my family’s experienced a fair bit of grief and sadness this year, but today’s blog is to celebrate something quite wonderful, my daughter’s wedding last Saturday.

Held inside a beautiful room at Vancouver’s Van Dusen Gardens, it was truly a spectacular day. I won’t have copies of the photographer’s photos for a few weeks, but my sister snapped a few on her phone, showcasing a couple of moments, which you’ll see here.

It was simply breathtaking to see Elida and her dad walk down the aisle and enjoy their father-daughter dance. To hear all of the amazing, and often funny speeches, to see family and friends come together and enjoy a fabulous meal, conversation, laughter, cake cutting, and dancing was simply amazing.

Elida & Brandon, DinnerThe sparkling backdrop behind the bride and groom’s table was a last-minute decision we added just before the wedding. The vendor didn’t supply backdrops or decorations, so I phoned the It’s My Party shop near my home and found that they could accommodate us, despite it only being a day or two before the wedding. My son, husband, and brother-in-law assembled and erected the 24- foot long structure, finishing about an hour before the guests arrived. Sometimes, flying by the seat of one’s pants pays off .

The most important thing, though is that everyone left that night happy and smiling. So now, after fifteen months of discussions, shopping, decision making, growing anxiety and stress, this event is in family’s history books. The bride and groom will be moving into their brand new home in two weeks and there will be more celebration over the coming months, and for that I’m very grateful.

Elida & Bark dancing

Advertisements

WordVancouver 2019 Coming Soon!

Word+Vancouver+2019+Website+Banner+SquareIn just two weeks, from Tues., Sept. 24th to Sun. Sept. 29th, the annual WORDVancouver festival will be celebrating its 25th year here in Vancouver. This celebration of reading and writing will feature many author readings, exhibits, workshops, panel discussions, and all kinds of fun stuff.

I love this event because it has something to offer people of all ages and reading preferences. Poets, comic book authors, nonfiction writers, Indigenous authors, and many fiction authors, among others, will be there.

The biggest day is the final day, Sunday, where there will also be musical entertainment. This free, family-friendly event will be held both outdoor and indoors down at and around Vancouver’s main public library on Georgia St.

I’ll be helping volunteer at the Crime Writers of Canada table from 11:00 to 1:00 p.m. There will also be a panel discussion on Setting in Crime Fiction from 12:05 to 1:05 pm in the Montalbano Family Theatre, so if you’re a fan of crime writing, come by and check us out!

You can learn more about the festival’s schedule HERE

Hope to see you there!

Celebrating International Literacy Day

tumblr_ma0chcq3dn1qedj2ho1_1280[1].pngFor those who don’t know, today is International Literacy Day. Created by UNESCO’s General Conference in 1966, the purpose of this event is to raise awareness of the important of literacy in communities around the globe.

According to one website, 16% of the world’s population, two thirds of them girls, are unable to read or write in their native language. While many programs are underway and doing great things to help, there’s still a long way to go. You can learn more HERE

There are plenty of things people can do to help promote literacy, but just helping someone with reading challenges is a huge and important step forward. When my kids were little, I spent many hours over the years reading to them. It’s one of the best things I ever did as a Mom.

This year’s theme is Literacy and Multilingualism. I work in the Linguistics department at a university here in Canada, and most of the people in my department speak at least two languages. Some speak four or five, and one professor far more than that! Three of our faculty members and others are working diligently to teach and record Indigenous languages, and to instruct other students on how to teach those languages before they are lost. It’s quite remarkable.

So, hats off to literacy and multilingualism, learning and communicating. No matter how technologically advanced we become, it doesn’t mean much if you can’t express and share your ideas with words.

The Growth of a Popular Scam

I love blogging on WordPress. It’s introduced me to many great people whose blogs I enjoy reading and learning from. From time to time, I’ve also entertained the idea of adapting my books into screenplays. Screenwriting interests me, and understandably, many authors would love to see their books make it to TV or movie screens.

WordPress has raised my profile, apparently enough to attract the attention of unsolicited emails from strangers offering to promote my books. Some of them even take the time to mention my latest title, Knock Knock. But I’m also seeing more unsolicited offers to help turn my books into movies. Hmm. Sounds a little too good to be true, right?

fraud-alert-sign[1]According to Victoria Strauss, who’s written a really informative piece for Writer Beware®, there’s been an explosion of “book-to-screen scams”, which offer to help authors turn their books into movie deals. Some of the packages are rather elaborate, not to mention expensive, but they quite enticing.

This scam isn’t new, Strauss notes, but it is increasingly prevalent, which is why she wants people to understand how it works. Strauss adds that it’s debatable if any of these services, regardless of who provides it, actually get the desired results for authors. I also know that I’m regularly approached on LinkedIn with a similar type of offer.

If you’re approached by a service that sounds too good to be true, please exercise due diligence, and read Victoria Strauss’s blog HERE.

Maybe we authors should prepare a list of legitimate sites that assists authors, although perhaps one already exists somewhere.

Production of The Blade Man in Full Swing

self-publishing[1]Just over a month ago, I blogged about getting the changes back from my editor for my sixth Casey Holland mystery, The Blade Man. I’ve been working on the book every day and the edits are now finished, although I’m still revising the all-important back cover blurb. With my editor’s help, I’ve just about finalized it, and am putting the blurb away for a few days before taking another look.

Happily, there were no substantive changes to the manuscript, which is why the process went so quickly, but I did write several drafts to create a plot that won’t have logic or continuity issues. Most of the edits involved changing the occasional sentence around, choosing a different word, and catching typos. She’s also pointed out favorite words that I use repeatedly (Find and Replace are my favorite editing tools in Word). I’m also enduring a lifelong battles with commas.

I’ve been working on answering that 5-page questionnaire the jacket designer, Deranged Doctor Design, sent me. This week’s task was to look at other mystery novel covers to see what types of covers I’m drawn to. A search on Amazon provide to be an interesting exercise. It clarified for me things that I really like about covers and things I don’t.

I was also asked to visit DDD’s website to identify some of my favorite covers, which I did. By the way, if you’re curious, visit derangeddoctordesign. They produce a wide variety of covers in different genres. They always respond to my emails promptly and are courteous, patient people.

The cover reveal likely won’t be happen until the latter half of December or possibly January, which is fine, given that there are plenty of other production tasks ahead, not to mention some personal events that include my daughter’s wedding in three weeks and their move into a new house.

Soon, I’ll start formatting the book, which won’t be as daunting as it was with Knock Knock, since I already have the template set up. It’s an exciting, productive time, and at some point I’ll nail down a cover reveal date and a launch date. Stay tuned!

5 Things I Learned From the Great Telus Email Crash of 2019

email-me-clipart[1]As I write this, Telus has still not resolved its email issues after one entire week of trouble. Thankfully, I don’t depend on it for much of my writing business. Every once in a while, I’ll receive notification that money’s been paid by Amazon or D2D, but otherwise most of my emails are blogs and newsletters. A small percentage of emails are from family, though they can text or phone anytime. The rest are review requests or writing event notifications. Of course, another small percentage is spam.

So, I’m looking on the positive side of the great Telus crash, and have learned a few things:

  1. Patience really is a virtue. I can’t control anyone’s inability to fix technical problems, so I’m not losing sleep over it, although I feel terrible for those whose businesses depend on it Telus’s email.
  1. I’m not nearly as dependent on emails as I thought I was. I’m far more dependent on the net in general, and my phone, or even my car. Thankfully, they’re working just fine.
  1. I have a gmail account, which I’ll start using more often. This one sends emails to my phone, so I’ll get them quicker. Not that I want to read blogs and newsletters on a tiny screen, but if someone’s trying to get hold of me, I’ll respond faster through gmail.
  1. Telus’s mess allowed me to catch up on all the blogs and newsletters that regularly fill my inbox.
  1. I’m getting more editing and organizing done.

Because I follow a lot of blogs, it usually takes me a whole week to read them all, and even then I skim quickly or skip the topics that don’t resonate. This week, I took the time to read each one carefully, and even commented on several.

Since I’m spending less time reading newsletters, I’m spending more time editing and organizing files and articles into binders that I’ve been talking about doing. Yay! So, it’s not all bad. Crap happens, but I’m finding ways to make the best of it.

Returning to a Favorite Pastime

ink_flower_by_denadavis[1]Creative people fascinate me, and they have long before I became a writer. One of the most interesting things I’ve learned (aside from the fact that most of us have sleep issues) is how frequently writers delve into other art forms to express themselves, especially through painting. I’ve met several terrific artists who also write fiction and nonfiction. Multi-faceted creative folks isn’t a surprise, though. If you allow yourself to open your mind to possibilities and take the time to explore, it’s amazing what will come.

This weekend, while working out at the gym, I started thinking about writing and painting. I also thought about how I would spend more of my free time once I retire from the day job in a few months. Sure, I might write a little more, but given that long periods at a keyboard aren’t healthy (after four decades of typing my posture’s not great and eye strain’s a problem) I’ve decided that extra physical fitness is a good idea, and one that I happen to welcome.

But another idea has come to mind, and it’s based on something that very few people know about me. A little over three decades ago, when I was working on my first novel and pregnant with my first child, I was working on pen-and-ink drawings. (The drawing above isn’t mine, but I think it’s beautiful).

I don’t remember how many pictures I drew, but I still have my sketch book buried beneath stacks of paper in my office closet. I used to draw graveyards and stark, leafless trees, which I suppose isn’t a psychological stretch from the mystery thrillers that I write today. But you know, I’m now thinking about pulling out that sketch at some point to explore the possibility of going back to drawing.

Several months ago my hubby the accountant returned (after a long absence) to painting watercolor landscapes. He too, has trouble staying asleep, so each morning he awakes very early, goes downstairs, and experiments with color and design and ideas before he leaves for work. He loves it. It feels like it sets a positive tone to his day. It’s also given him a new appreciation for the nearly forty years I’ve devoted to my passion for writing. We talked about goals and satisfaction and pushing through tough times until perseverance slowly turns to habit.

I’m not worried about not finding enough to do when I retire. I worry more about having time to do everything I want to. There will be more goals—brand new ones—and although I’m not ready to remove the sketch book out from under all that paper today, it’s now on my radar. We’ll see what happens.